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Asd And Empathy Article


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#1 rama

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 08:18 PM

http://seventhvoice....thize-too-much/

 

 

Sorry for the ridiculously massive link, I don't know how you can reduce it so its a smaller link.If anyone knows can they tell me! 

It's a bit of a black and white article( as in individuals are THIS now not THIS!) but might be interesting for some people.x

 

 

 

P.S Oh yey it's made it smaller, I am such a techno duffer.


Edited by rama, 16 November 2013 - 08:19 PM.

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#2 madferretlady

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 09:35 PM

had a look and I actually would agree 



#3 rama

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 09:57 PM

I agree partially from observations of our daughter.Will be interesting to see what other people think.



#4 gingerpig

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:42 PM

I guess it fits in with the recent discovery that folks with ASD have many more interconnections in the brain than those who don't. We take more in, wobble it all over our brains and lack the executive function to organise it.

#5 Pairofpants

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:43 PM

My daughter is only 5 and language delayed. I can't see this theory displayed in her but I can understand how it could be feasible

#6 maximus prime

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 07:39 AM

Lucy has no problems at all with empathy in fact she is really sensitive to the needs of others particularly those she views as less able than she is or those younger or smaller. She's also quick to point out if she believes someone is being treated harshly or unfairly.

Jack on the other hand really can't see outside of himself and even then he has problems understanding what he himself feels and so rather than being empathetic he appears bemused or confused. The exception though is with Lucy who he will comfort and sympathise with if she appears in any way less than happy.

So when she came home with a tiny cut after being hit by a ball last week he noticed it straight away, wanted all the details, put his arm round her, made lots of clucking noises and stroked her hair and reassured her. So he knows what to do and can recognise the need in Lucy but doesn't pick up the same cues in anyone else.

#7 Eggman

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 10:31 AM

I didn't like the insinuation that it's only people with 'Aspergers Syndrome' who empathise too much.

 

Yet another example of why I will be happy when the diagnostic criteria changes.



#8 gingerpig

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 10:50 AM

I struggle with that - but the criteria have already changed. People just feel comfortable using the term Aspergers as opposed to ASD. I LIKE using ASD.

#9 Eggman

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 12:01 PM

Gingerpig - didn't realise it had already changed. Pity the media are still behind though and wonder how long (if ever) they will catch up.

 

LE is very much like this he can get overly upset even about an inanimate object such as his recent lego creation.

 

It's a 3 in 1 set and he refuses to change it to one of the other creations he can make because he doesn't want to upset/make the other one sad he has already made!

 

This is typical of him.

 

Even is someone mocks being upset LE will get very anxious and want that person to stop.

 

He's always been this way even before he could talk.

 

He refused to watch a Winnie the Pooh movie because Tigger lost his bounce. He was distraught over it. Same with a TV programme about a bear he was in tears again when the bear was sad. Even to this day he will get incredibly upset if a character in a movie gets into trouble or is sad about something.

 

He definately feels too much not the other way around.



#10 madferretlady

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 12:14 PM

I guess it fits in with the recent discovery that folks with ASD have many more interconnections in the brain than those who don't. We take more in, wobble it all over our brains and lack the executive function to organise it.

I would love to read this gingerpig. Can you remember where you saw this?


i agree that this should not just be associated with "asperger". I know your point was it should be all ASD - but I want to take this further into ADD/ADHD territory. My ADHD JK is forever getting into trouble because he interferes in things which have absolutely nothing to do with him because he thinks someone is being treated unfairly. he gets very upset and will go on an on about whatever it was for ages afterward - I have had to physically restrain him from going over to other parents (generally complete strangers) and shouting at them for telling off their kids (he is 9). My ADD daughter also feels very deeply - but as she lacks the impulsivity of her brother (the hyperactivity) she is unable to act on her emotions and feelings and becomes overwhelmed and "freezes". To me this is very similiar to what is being said about people with ASD 



#11 hel

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 09:49 PM

Strikes me that this is yet another sensory issue. In the same way as people with ASD can be hypo or hyper sensitive to noise is empathy the same?


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