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Repetitive Behaviours


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#1 Mummyo5

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 09:51 AM

Hi all new to the group , we are currently going through the process of dx for my 18m old , I have an 8 year old with pdd-nos , so not exactly new to this but my little one is presenting a lot differently ,

- no eye contact ( deliberately try's any way to look away)
- non verbal does babble b and d sounds( regression was saying bye- bye and birdie ( watches rio a lot ) but is no longer
- no imaginative play
- hates change ( put him in a new pram the other day and the meltdown was incredible )
theres more but the bit I'm not to sure about is the repetative behavior

Would
playing with a ball for hours be an indicator
or doors having to be closed
or walking around a chair, house, car untill I get dizzy watching
or spinning his plane propeller
or watching movie credits over and over

I have no ideA as my 8 yo only repetative behaviour was and still is the hand flapping

Also would this come under high functioning or low if it does go that way

p.s sorry for the gramma and spelling still trying to work this damn I pad out

#2 Eggman

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 12:29 PM

Sounds like repetitive behaviours to me and pretty much everything you describe my son did too at that age. You could be describing my son.

 

LE is now high functioning and often described as having Aspergers. He was diagnosed with HF autism as we were told that would be a more useful diagnosis for us with regards to accessing support for him at school.

 

When he was your son's age he presented as much more severe, many more ASD traits as you describe although saying that his understanding was very good even though he had little to no speech just the odd word if we were lucky.

 

He made no eye contact and had no gestures either. He too used to acquire words and then lose them again.

 

He started to talk around the age of nearly 5 in sentences and within 6 months he not only caught up completely but scored very highly in expressive language! The acquisition of language seemed to make a huge difference and he steadily improved over time.

 

He is now of average cognitive ability and ahead in some areas.

 

We had to wait some time for a diagnosis. He was in the system at 3 years of age but didn't get diagnosed until he was 7. That was because in our area they did not like to diagnose children with ASD until that age.

 

If he would have been diagnosed at 3 I am pretty sure he would have received a low functioning type of diagnosis not HF.

 

I would go and get your son referred to a Speech and Language Therapist and a Paediatrician now as it can take some time for these appointments to come through. We waited a year for both appointments.

 

My son was diagnosed with Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia and I was given work to do with him at home. He needed very specific intervention.

 

At 3 he was diagnosed with a Communication Disorder and as I said at 7 Autism.



#3 littlewren

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 01:04 PM

Sounds very similar to my son at that age, he was non verbal well into his 2nd year I wish I had at the time realised that was an early warning and pushed for speech referral - as someone has mentioned speak to your HV and get him seen. He was very ocd at that age (light switches, touching certain parts of the stairs etc) He wasnt one to spin wheels or propellers but he used to roll his trains along the floor with his eye mm's away from the wheels. Alot of these behaviours have subsided and been replaced with others so as im sure you did with your eldest write all these things down because they can be easily forgotten when he moves on to the next behaviour.



#4 TiredandGrumpy

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 09:55 AM

William had many repetitive behaviours at the age of 3 and a severe language delay - although, ironically, could repeat speech, which the HV cited as positive as she was convinced he did not have autism. It was only after we saw the paediatrician that I learned what echolalia was. By the time he was diagnosed (at the age of 3), I asked if she considered him low or high functioning.  She pointed out that although, at the age of 3, many would perhaps consider him low functioning, she did not consider that that descriptor would necessarily remain the same - that there would be times when he would very much fit 'low functioning', but that at other times, depending on a variety of factors, he would fit 'high-functioning'.

I think she was right and I guess this will be the case all through his life.  

 

His repetitive behaviours have lessened, although he has a few key obsessions - some are long-term ones: pylons, traffic lights, google maps, others more transient:  Kinder Eggs (You Tube), Mario, Minecraft, listening to the 20th Century Fox theme tune (on You Tube) - that became so irritating  :headspin:

 

On a positive note, his non-functional echolalia now has become quite functional e.g. if Ellen is poorly, he will say, "Poor Thomas!" lifted from Thomas the Tank, because he recognises she is unwell.  But even better than that, yesterday, his big brother came home to visit and told him, "I like Kinder Eggs, Minecraft, pylons and sausages!" A huge sentence, full of meaning for him  :applaud



#5 Mummyo5

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 09:48 AM

Hi ladies thankyou for the replys, luckily I new something was up having been through it with bob mr 8 , so I trotted of to the audioligist knowing it was the first thing the pead would want when told he dosent respond to his name, ( mild loss in left ear) at the same time had him put on the waiting list for speech ( we have had two sessions her office has a coffee table so Luke is getting some great exercise doing laps lol) it will be slow going, pead has now made referal I'm told it can take awhile although he will receive all services in the mean while, with mr bob they observed him over 8 sessions at early intervention ( 10 months) team of ot, psych , speach and pead, we have been refereed to the same mob so hopefully they have a different method with the younger ones as early intervention is 2.8 years plus ,

, next question does anyone have any tips on communicating with my little man , he drags me around the house at the moment and it is working , but trying some other things couldn't hurt

#6 maximus prime

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 01:25 PM

Lucy was referred to Jack's paediatrician at 13 months following a regression. Jack had been diagnosed at 3 with autism and was 9. The paed initially ordered blood and urine tests to check for chromosome and metabolic disorders. When these came back clear she was referred to a multi disciplinary assessment for autism.

 

At 18 months Lucy was silent, she didn't laugh or cry or smile. She didn't wave or point or clap and if you left her in one spot she wouldn't move for hours.

 

Lucy's repetitive behaviours were patting things, she didn't touch or pick things up she'd pat everything and everybody. The other thing she did was lay on her back and raise her legs and let them flop to the floor.

 

To communicate with Jack we used PECS http://www.autism.or...ion-system.aspx and with Lucy we used Makaton. The SALT should be able to help with both these.



#7 TiredandGrumpy

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 07:19 PM

Hi, to start with SALT helped us in using PEIC D (Promoting Early Interactive Conversations Dorset).  This is the link which explains it better than I could:

 

http://www.poole.gov...-dorset-peic-d/

 

If it doesn't work, just google PEIC D, it should find it.  We found it reasonably helpful - however, William came to realise what we were trying to do and then completely refused to co-operate!!  Portage really tried this, but every time she came through the front door, he would be trying to disappear out the back because he knew what was coming.

 

We soon moved onto PECs and Signalong - a bit like Makaton - I think it is what SALT tended to use in Dorset.

 

We were quite lucky in that the SALT visited the SN nursery William attended twice a week - she also ran various sessions to support parents in using PECs, Signalong and PEIC D.


Edited by TiredandGrumpy, 03 March 2015 - 07:24 PM.





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