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Can Lgo Deal With This?

LA named unsuitable school

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#1 jennybongo

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 12:35 PM

We are now in a hopeless situation with DS2. There is no suitable placement for him to go with the needs he has. I am forced to make a decision out of (pardon the phrase) 'the best of a bad lot'. How can I send my child to a setting that could damage him? I don't think I have any LGO rights because I have the right of appeal against the final statement. 
SEN have written to say panel have gone with an IR who have written to us to say 'If ****** came here he would be learning on his own and without peers which is understandably not what you want''. How dare they force this on DS2. It's waking me up at night, I feel sick because actually there is no solution. If I had something to fight for I would but what he needs does not exist here.
He has Aspergers but he is not an active class member. He withdraws himself from the class and has not developed friendships in the usual sense. His infant school currently offers a nurture group which he goes in with similar ability children and learns 2:1, the TA liaises with the teacher and he does what his class does, albeit differentiated if needed.

If he is not coping he can access the nurture provision, it is central within school and it is very good. Sadly, his time at Infant school finishes in July and nothing else can offer the same.

SEN panel says IR provision but yet both Integrated resources here are highly inclusive expecting the academically able to be in busy mainstream class rooms. One IR doesn't use the IR for curricular learning and the other is for much much lower functioning children. All he needs is small class sizes for the academically able. It just doesn't exist here. What can I do?

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by jennybongo, 11 May 2013 - 12:37 PM.


#2 maximus prime

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 01:00 PM

I'm pretty sure that LGO won't touch anything that you have the right of appeal against.My experience of them has been that they are largely toothless anyway and don't seem to understand the complexities of SEN law.

 

The IR have been very clever with their wording because they have said they can't meet needs but dressed it up in a way that isn't useful. Jack's unit which LA named for post 16 was much more helpful by stating directly they couldn't meet his needs because they were an Academy and so we were set for Judicial Review on the grounds of irrationality.

 

Judicial Review threatened resulted in a total back down and Jack got his place at SH before Tribunal date. 



#3 imperfect parent

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

I think MP's right.  The LGO will want you to use the Tribunal route.

 

It's a stage transfer, so you should have had your amended statement by Feb 15th to allow time for an appeal to go through before the start of the new academic year.

 

Your problem is more that what he needs is not available.  Going to LGO or Tribunal is not the issue; the issue is how do you get what he needs?

 

Ultimately it boils down to accepting what appears to be unsuitable and trying to get it to work.  Best thing you can do is talk to other parents with children in your local schools and see which school is most accepting of parental views.

 

Can PP help?



#4 apricot

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:01 AM

What would be an appropriate peer group though? It is not likely to be children of the same chronological age and intelligence as they will be far more socially developed than he is and he will be confused and isolated when he can't keep up with the speed of social exchanges in a normal group. Learning academic stuff on his own is not necessarily a bad thing if they can integrate him with a suitable group for social learning. DS is way brighter than the rest of the children in his class but they are the 'right' social/emotional level for him so it works.



#5 Jolly Roger

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:25 AM

The thing is, the Tribunal will order the local authority to provide an appropriate school place that meets his needs. That's his legal entitlement - NOT "the best of a bad bunch."

It sounds like you're going to have a hell of a scrap on your hands, but don't give up.

For example, there was nothing appropriate for LN at secondary level where we live, so about three years before transition we started to let the LEA know exactly what we wanted for him.

We gathered together all the evidence from as many sources as possible, and found an out-of-authority provision that could meet his needs. The rest was down to the local authority: either buy him a place out of authority and transport him there, or create a suitable provision. They chose the latter.

Our advantage here is that ever since we arrived here ten years ago the local authority knows that if they don't deliver, they are going to have a rough ride with us - because I play by my "Three Laws of Local Authority Action:"

1. The results you get from local authorities are directly proportional to the amount of work you can cause them,
2. No matter how much local authorities promise, they will always deliver the absolute minimum they can get away with,
3. When faced with a decision, they will always make the choice that requires the least amount of effort from them.

They know that if they don't deliver, they will have an awful lot of work on their hands.

#6 maximus prime

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 12:09 PM

What would be an appropriate peer group though? It is not likely to be children of the same chronological age and intelligence as they will be far more socially developed than he is and he will be confused and isolated when he can't keep up with the speed of social exchanges in a normal group. Learning academic stuff on his own is not necessarily a bad thing if they can integrate him with a suitable group for social learning. DS is way brighter than the rest of the children in his class but they are the 'right' social/emotional level for him so it works.

It's pretty much like that for Jack in his school. Academically he's far ahead but socially he's probably the least able but it doesn't really matter tbh because each child in his class of 5.5 follows a very individual timetable.

 

Jack's academic learning is either self led because he has interests he likes to pursue, completely different to what he's studied before so he's been accessing college to do a media studies course focusing on film and animation or it's using the academics he already has in a vocational way so he worked at the library and post office and now in Oxfam.

 

He's more included and happier now than he was when his peers fit more his academic profile than his social one tbh 





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