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#1 bluewater

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 03:44 AM

We have a situation where ds1 is now LAC away from home. Part of this was due to his behaviour at home. Since leaving home (and actually well before) he had basically rejected us. He communicates with husband via i-message if he wants something, but otherwise has rejected most communication, especially initiated by us. My husband has tried to meet him and he has refused.

We then received an email from SW yesterday accusing us of doing nothing to rehabilitate him home!

We have obviously had no support of any sort, we have been to see CAMHS, who won't help because he is out of their area, and have no idea what else we can do?

#2 caci

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 10:22 AM

I have no experience at all of this, but didn't want to read and run.

 

I know a few of people in group have LACs, but I am not sure if they will have realised what your message is about from the title. If you don't get any replies after a few days, it might be worth re-posting with 'LAC' as the title ?



#3 apricot

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 11:08 AM

I usually turn this sort of thing back on the culprit.

i.e.

Thank you for your email. We would welcome any practical suggestions from you on how to help DS come home.

CAMHS refuse to see him as he is out of our area.  Can you get our CAMHS to change their decision? Can you refer him to CAMHS in the LAC area? 

DS refuses to make contact with us - list examples of DS refusing contact. Can you get DS to co-operate? 

Can you provide any other support? 

We are very willing to work with you and would love to have DS home once he can live safely in a family environment, without negative impact on us and his siblings. 

What is your plan to take this forward? 

 

Usually results in professional backing off rather than actual help, but at least it puts the ball firmly back in their court while demonstrating you are willing to co-operate.


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#4 queen claudia

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 12:37 PM

Apricot, brilliant lol.



#5 bluewater

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 02:00 PM

Thanks for this advice. I was shocked that the SW wrote this and quite upset, and I will definitely be writing with some of your great ideas. Thanks

#6 mrselvis

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Posted 20 September 2016 - 04:01 PM

Apricot's suggestions are fab. You should be having regular LAC reviews and a care plan in place, is this happening?
I am in Scotland and my son is under a LAC (section 25 - voluntary, we maintain full parental rights and guardianship) as he is in a residential school placement.

#7 bluewater

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 06:58 PM

Thanks for all the support above. We now have a comprehensive record that we produce of all contact attempts, and a record of the catch 22 we are in regarding support from CAMHS.

 

After last hearing, we thought we had established stability at least until the end of this academic year. However, ds1 is out with LA area, and a new policy is now being implemented to bring LAC back within LA area. Shortly, SW are very convincingly arguing to move ds1 from school supportive environment to staffed flat and nearby large mainstream school.

 

Ds1 rejects all support in school (makes him different), and because no specific issues have ever been pinpointed (reasons for refusal changed as each problem was solved) it is hard to specify/implement support strategies. Just before he became LAC he was blaming the teaching methods and the course content.

 

SW work have told us we are judging him based on the past (which is only 6 months ago) and seem to have no qualms moving him mid exam year, at short notice, which is going to add even more stress.

 

I am so angry that last month SW were arguing blue in the face that he couldn't be moved because he needed the day to day therapeutic aspect of support at his current school, and now they have u-turned saying he's a changed person, as if the AS has evaporated... 

 

I am really worried he will refuse again, and leave school with no qualifications or even track record of attendance.

 

Interestingly, we are always told of LAC reviews but not invited. We are told the Child plan has superceded the care plans, which no longer exist. He should have an IEP we have never seen.

 

Sorry about the rant.

 

Any advice about any aspect of this gratefully received.



#8 mrselvis

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 09:26 AM

How does your son feel about the potential movement of placement? Does he have a Care Pathway Plan in place? It is a legal requirement he has one and should be reviewed every 6 months or in a situation like this where a change in circumstance may occur. The Care Pathway considers the views of the young person and is very person centred. Our son is Looked After but it's under a section 25 (voluntary) and we retain full parental rights and have both welfare and financial guardianship in place for him. We were very involved in Care Pathway Planning and I've used the legislation to secure funding and placement opportunities for him. We also attend all reviews. I'm not sure why you aren't invited.

http://www.gov.scot/.../03/19113/34725

Does he have access to an advocacy service? Who Cares? Are the advocacy service for Looked After Young People in Scotland. They should act as a voice for your son and are independent. I'll post a link to them
http://www.whocaresscotland.org

Edited by mrselvis, 30 October 2016 - 09:27 AM.


#9 bluewater

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 11:42 AM

Hi

 

Thanks for all the help. We have been in touch with the Scottish Child Law Centre, who were extremely helpful, and we now know we have been wrongly excluded from the Child Plan Reviews... We are lodging a complaint with the LA.

 

ds1 wants to move but every person I have spoken to from education, care, parents, say moving 3 months before national 5's is madness and would be stressful for any child let alone with ASD and history of refusing school. We think moving at the end of May is the obvious time (new timetable, start of highers etc + school would be able to add him into calculations for SfL staff). Only SW seem to think moving pre exams is a good idea (financially maybe). Apparently though, their recommendation tends to be followed.

 

We learnt also that the new accommodation is dependent on him attending school, so he would be moved again if he started refusing again!



#10 imperfect parent

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 07:06 PM

As the parent of 2 ASD children who have were labelled school refusers I take issue with the term; so many who "school refuse" are desperate to go to a suitable school, and are in fact able to do so when reasonable adjustments are made and/ or a suitable school is found.

 

10 -13 year olds get the best deal when changing schools, younger children are expected to do as they are told with out recognition of the issues, older ones are expected to attend regardless of the issues.  There is never an ideal time to move, but sooner rather than later is best for those who are struggling to attend.  Preparation and realistic expectations are essential.  In my opinion if a child wants to move there is something very wrong with where they are, and it is worth exploring what support would be put in place before making any decisions.



#11 bluewater

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 10:52 PM

He is actually attending fully at his current school which is SN residential and really well supported. See just doesn't like it. The move would be back to large mainstream comprehensive similar to his previous high school where he refused for 2 years (he hated that too). Hence the worry  that he might return to refusing if moved, whilst at the moment he is well supported and achieving.



#12 imperfect parent

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 07:36 PM

Does he want to move back to mainstream, or is that the only option?  Would he prefer his current school as a day pupil? ( I know that my boys would have preferred to be day pupils, as they enjoyed the education element of the school, but not the residential.)

 

One school we looked at offered 3 nights residential to more local pupils.



#13 bluewater

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:29 PM

I think he would prefer not to be at school at all... He has a residential placement partly because of his behaviour at home.

 

He thinks he will be able to manage a return to mainstream. However, the support in the mainstream school is very similar to those in the school he refused at, where he rejected all forms of support (not wanting to appear different in any way to his peers). 



#14 bluewater

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 10:08 AM

We survived yet another children's panel hearing. A few days before ds1 decided he actually wanted to stay where he was until after the exams, added to which, social work discovered they weren't going to be able to place ds1 in the house they had hoped for. So a brief reprieve, although very little seems to be happening re transition planning for leaving school (supposed to be a 12 months lead in) which he keeps threatening to do once he turns 16 in the summer.

 

We have also hopefully resolved being kept out of the LAC reviews (very little notice of date changes and meetings being held an 8 hour round trip away) so hopefully that side is looking up too.


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