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#16 Miss Mac

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 11:09 AM

For those you can...the gains will be tremendous.


They may be tremendous in some instances. In other cases home education can cause harm.

Much depends on the child and the need, and also a parent's ability to home educate. Many (although not all) aspies will thrive in a good school environment and this provides an excellent platform for success in careers as they benefit enormously from the social skills in co-operative working. A bad school environment will cause harm to a child, as will some attempts at home education.

I know it is a choice that people think very carefully about.

Yes, we are a UK site. The education system is very different here as is the set-up for Home Education.
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#17 Shiroi Tora

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 11:31 AM

How is the set up for home schooling there? Is it a viable option for most? Are there accredited home courses? How different is your education system?

I would appreciate any answers as it would help me tailor my future posts.

#18 Miss Mac

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 12:24 PM

It is far, far less common than it is in the USA. I don't home educate - I'm a teacher by profession. Whilst having strengths in literature, languages, humanities and social sciences, I certainly couldn't provide adequate tuition for a 13+ year-old in science and maths. I know I couldn't provide highly-specialised education for a severely autistic non-verbal child.

Our two NT children (who are G&T) are taught in an exceptional school which really does promote development (not just academically but also of the individual). Our ASD son is taught by ASD-specific professionals in a special school. All three thrive.

Home education here is unregulated. Some areas have support networks, others don't. As far as I'm aware there's no accredited programmes - it's up to each parent to decide how to educate their child. Some home educated children take GCSEs and A'Levels, some don't. Some will access a school or college part time, others won't. Some will be subjected to education-by-playstation, others will be removed from a stressful school situation and be allowed to get their mental-health back on track before returning to the education system.

Many parents here home educate because there is no viable school alternative. Many (although not all) would send their child to school if the appropriate placement could be found. Many people doing home education seem to be doing it as a stop-gap between school provisions - although there are a number of parents who home educate permanently and very strongly recommend it.

People who do home educate will be able to give you a much more precise answer than I can. However, in the education system provision can range from support in mainstream, to Asperger-specific schooling, to SLD/MLD autism-specific provision, to units attached to mainstream schools, to language units and so on. It's quite varied and if you can get the correct placement can do absolutely amazing things. These schools do not need to be paid for by the parent. There can be a fight to get the correct placement and it's harder in some areas than others, but the vast majority of parents would prefer their child to be educated at school.

#19 Shiroi Tora

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 12:38 PM

Ah...I can understand why most would rather send to school there. You seem to have a very good system set up. Here the schools are not so well defined for the special needs of children...especially the gifted.

However...there are many resources for home schooling here. Many, if not most, of the gifted home schooled children utilize Plato (on-line educational system).

Very good...thank you for the well defined answer.

#20 maximus prime

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 12:46 PM

I think Jack would have preferred to be home schooled because he would be able to avoid all the stuff he finds difficult.

I think he would probably have managed very well in all the subjects he finds interesting because he is very self motivated.

I think all the subjects he finds boring would have ended up being an all out war to get him to put in even minimum effort.

I wouldn't have wanted to home ed in any circumstances because I want a break from him and the autism tbh and so concentrated my energies on getting the right school place for Jack instead.

Lucy enjoys the company of her peers and the opportunities school provides so she would have hated to be home schooled by me.

It has been an effort every day this week to persuade her to come home from her after school clubs :rolleyes:

Edited by donna2512, 12 September 2010 - 12:47 PM.


#21 tedybearr

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 02:57 PM

I think B would enjoy being H/E tbh.
Hes so much more calmer at home, i find him easier than when hes been to school.
Hes really missed an awful lot so have been temporarily teaching him anywaY
I quite enjoy it, what i dont enjoy is him having the biggest meltdowns after coming home from school, the stress and just the fear he has about having to actually go.
Because i think he doesnt want to be there, hes learning nothing.
He seems more interested in things when hes at home.
Am seriously thinking about it if all other options fail.

when i actually think deeper about school, he more concerned about the school setting, the kids, if hes going to be shouted at, it its too noisey etc.
How on earth can he learn anything when his head is already to ful up with these thoughts.

Edited by tedybearr, 12 September 2010 - 03:00 PM.


#22 Shiroi Tora

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 03:08 PM

Yes...my son hated the noise and the bustling of the children...he is so much calmer and happier...and his learning is increasing at an even more rapid rate now than when he was in school. He loves the learning atmosphere at home.

#23 elemental

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 08:21 PM

Yes...my son hated the noise and the bustling of the children...he is so much calmer and happier...and his learning is increasing at an even more rapid rate now than when he was in school. He loves the learning atmosphere at home.



HI home education in my experience is very common and on the increase in the uk. It is not just the choice of people who find schools inadequate, alot of people choose to home educate as a life style choice and to have a more connected family and active community life. There are lots of thriving supportive networks, I have home educated for three years and have had a very positive experience on the whole. It's much easier to manage stress and teach coping techniques. Most areas will do shared teaching or tutors if you want that or just to meet up for social stuff.
If you want contacts or any practical political info contact 'education otherwise' who are the central body for home education in the uk, they can link you up with what's happening in any specific area..

#24 Assisi

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:43 PM

I am home educating my son on an LEA part-funded ABA programme, which will be gradually transitioned into school. But the thought of school and forcing my son to follow a timetable is daunting, when currently we are so relaxed and flexible in a morning.
I think home education must be of interest to many parents, especially when their kids just don't fit into the correct categories.

#25 tedybearr

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:28 AM

I have been having alot of trouble getting B into school, apart from the not sleeping:angry:we have a war every morning, or we did!!!!!!
He was so good through the summer hols, i didnt get bitten, punched or kicked:excellent
He has been refusing since start of term and the last 2 wks has been PT.
Unfortunately hes only attended 3 days so now they're putting hospital ED in place and outreach lady due to his anxiety issues.
The school has agreed to fund this:excellent.
He will not go back to school until he starts yr 7 which is next Sept.

#26 elemental

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 09:04 AM

Some useful info for people who are considering home educating or already doing it..

http://www.he-special.org.uk/


http://www.amazon.co...94&sr=8-3-spell

a really good book

and this

http://www.amazon.co...pd_bxgy_b_img_b

#27 tedybearr

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 09:19 AM

Great link, thanks x

#28 fran

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 06:38 PM

When my son was thrown out of his mainstream junior school, i home schooled for about a year. It was the hardest most exhausting thing I have ever done. Now he is in a special school for ASD but today they have said that because he is at key stage 4 in maths and the other pupils are at key stage 1/2, that it may not be the right school for him. They is no other ASD school that is suitable. If he is made to leave I might have to home school again. so any help would be much appreciated.

fran x

#29 elemental

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 08:53 PM

http://www.aspergers.../ishelegal.html

#30 Florence

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 02:11 PM

Hi,

We have been home schooling our son for just over a year. He started school in September 09 and he changed from a happy chatty little boy to a scared confused and desperately sad one. It was unbearable to watch and just broke our hearts. My Dad said that 'school had sucked the life out of him'. We were already aware of home ed and I had been a stay at home mum until he started school when I got a job as a dinner lady so it wasn't really a great leap for us either income wise or lifestyle wise. At first we said it would just be until he was ready to start juniors at 7 but it's going so well and he's really happy and learning at a pace that's right for him that I doubt we will look at school until he is at least 11. But even then we may just go with one of the online schools that are now available. Nothing is set in stone for us, we have always said that the best way to educate the boy is something that will need to be constantly re assessed but right now this is definitely the best thing for him. Luckily there are a couple of great home ed groups where we live and there's lots going on for the kids that provides great social opportunities and because it's a smaller group of children the boy doesn't feel so overwhelmed and no one minds if he needs to go and sit under the table for 10 minutes to give himself a break.

I think for some children and their families whatever their needs may be home education can be a valid and very good option. For others it may not be what's best for them or it could even be a temporary answer until an appropriate school place is found.

If anyone has any questions please feel free to ask me and I will do the best I can to answer them. Home education seems to be growing rapidly in the UK so there are an increasing number of local groups and opportunities available to those who decide to take this option. Personally for us and more importantly for the boy this is the best thing we have ever done :yahoo:




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