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Combination Sensory Shower Unit


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#1 Jolly Roger

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 06:51 AM

My name is Bryan Usrey and I am currently studying a Master's in International Marketing Management at Leeds University Business School. As part of the course we are carrying out a live consultancy project on behalf of a company. I came across your website whilst carrying out research on behalf of this company.

They are looking to launch a new sensory product that will help people with autism when showering. The Sensory Shower Cubicle provides a range of audible, musical and visual features that excite the senses, ensuring a relaxing and soothing showering experience. It includes a bubble wall, doors with coloured light effects, colour TV, seating and handrails, splash proof doors, and easy access with ramp. The shower comes in one pod, and so can be installed in any room where there is electricity and drainage, and is fully installed and guaranteed for 5 years by the company.


https://docs.google....gujBL8/viewform

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#2 Busyknitter

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 07:50 AM

In my dreams, I think.

#3 CarerQuie

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:07 AM

It carefully doesn't mention the price of the unit...xx

#4 gingerpig

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:49 AM

As a shower is stimulation enough with the water, heat, humidity and all the annoyance of trying not to get anything in your eyes, personally I wouldn't need any extra stimulus. What's the purpose of this room is it to be sensory reducing or increasing?

How can something (I quote) "excite the senses" whilst being "soothing"? It will need to be a bit clearer as to what the aim is? For example in my house we have a sensory room that's designed to soothe with calm music, low, but interesting lights, vibration cushions, toys/weighted blankets to enhance proprioception etc. It's empahasis is on poviding a relaxing space to be to re charge. It's not a calm down room as too many things are breakable and there's nothing to throw or vent out rage on. It's also not a room to regulate sensory seeking as there's nothing to climb, jump off, etc.

My room cost about about £100 max to set up, how much does this cost?

How is it seeking to compare to established resources like safe spaces, indoor climbing activities, etc?

ps - is space going to be an issue if there's going to need to be a ramp installed? Why is a ramp being installed in the first place? Not sure how many ASD people are wheelchair users.
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#5 Dino mum

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 09:53 AM

I would like one but Dino boy is terrified of the shower, Im not sure if sensory overload would help. However if they had one as a bath package he'd love it although am sure out of our price range.


#6 Upsy Daisy

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:31 AM

To be honest, if I were to be installing a bubble wall, coloured lights and a sealed in tv I wouldn't be putting them in a shower.

My children perhaps 5 minutes a day in the shower so that's an awful lot of beautiful equipment for a very small part of the day.

If I were making that sort of investment I would be putting those resources into a sensory room or bedroom first where they could be used more and just accepting that showering is the hard bit of the day.

If I were trying to develop something to help keep children with ASD calm and engaged in the shower I'd be looking for something much less high-tech like a shower head each for child and carer or some calming, hands-on, waterproof sensory toys which could be fixed safely to a tiled wall.


 


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#7 Snickas

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:51 AM

Ok, teenage AS dd is obsessed with washing her hair, showers don't bother her at all :rolleyes:

Teenage son just hates being clean :rolleyes:  and thinks the world should just switch of their noses if he stinks from body odour :wall  :wall  :wall needless to say, we make him get a shower twice a week.
and J just loves playing with all of his boats, submarines, bubble machine, etc in the bath to even consider a shower!



Wow, gonna need a massive bathroom to install one of these.
I have a safespace and we had to have a big room to install that in!!!



#8 catiammatos

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 01:36 PM

Cheeky looooooves showering. However with all the distractions I don't know how clean he would actually come out!

 

I think it's a bit too much really. What is the purpose? If it's to soothe a meldown (just shove the kid the the shower kind of thing) I think it could potencially make matters worse for Cheeky (he needs a dark quiet place for that), if it's to entertain them well.... I think I would stick with the TV in the living room :D. I can imagine the water and electricity bills going up.

 

I can see however some usefulness for mums of ASD children. A nice pod with some soothing music and light effects while the water gently relaxes the muscles... ;). And if you want to watch some TV while the children are watching their horrid shows... oh well that's just a plus, isn't it?



#9 Snickas

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 01:58 PM

What's got me baffled is...
If you were to have this installed, I would assume you need the appropriate plumbing?
Which costs more money, installation of pipes, drainage, etc.
Then, how would the electricity work?
I don't know about anyone else but I completely forbid anything electrical in bathrooms! (Apart from showers, which are safely hidden away via tiles/plastering).

There's more...

If the TV was to show a PECS version of the appropriate way to shower, a step by step picture guidance, I could see that working.
Lights, ughhh sensory overload, because their touch senses will already be heightened due to the water on skin, etc.
Noises/music, ughhh, again, sensory overload. They need to listen to a parents encouragement to follow either instructions or encouragement to follow the PECS schedule (like we have to with M).
Ramp, why? That one really baffled me.

The whole point of Sensory Intergration is learning to turn down heightened senses and to control/learn to manage them.
Experience tells me that was you have one sensory problem under control, something else developes as you tend to work on the ones that are problematic at that specific time.

Bars and seating do work though. It helps the person to lean or sit on something whilst parent is washing legs, but it also helps them to find their center core again after hair washing (don't know if anyone notices but my lot get a bit clumsy and wobbly after hair washing, heck, even I do!).

Have you ever thought of pitching the idea on Dragons Den?

Edited by Snickas, 26 March 2013 - 01:59 PM.


#10 clarissa

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:23 PM

surely the shower in itself is a bit sensory. DD is like Snikas DD shower get very clean do hair. If kids cant shower then playing in the bath is the thing i think. If you are going to pay mega money then surely in a situation where the child can spend lots of time, not use up loads of water, and need tons of supervision.



#11 maximus prime

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:39 PM

I'm not sure that all the additional extras are wanted or necessary tbh. If your child loves to shower like Jack does then the shower is enough for him and he can quite happily spend a significant amount of time in there enjoying just the water.

If your child dislikes the shower then chances are the shower will happen like Snickas says twice a week and is purely functional and I wouldn't imagine the all singing all dancing shower cubicle will alter that.

So it's either pile in the technology for a child who will happily spend ages in the shower without it anyway or pile in the technology for a child who spends five minutes twice a week under duress.Not sure that I can see the point tbh.

#12 Snickas

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:33 PM

So...

Just had a shower...and couldn't help but think about this topic.

What would make a perfect sensory shower?

well...

 

Parental controls:

 

Outside of the shower. The parent sets the temperatures, plus an emergency stop button, that stops all water.
Let the parent set the colours of lights, choices between one colour (blue, red, green, etc) or multi. Not obvious lighting fast flashing lights but more of the fairy lights type variety.

I also think, if there was a power shower (in the middle of the cubicle) with jet sprays could work...some kids seek deep pressure and i think they would love being blasted with water! And if the jet sprays could also be quiet blow dryers (even though i know some of our kids don't like the noises out of the ones in public toilets), we'd be able to get them showered and dried all in one go!!!! BUT if the parent could control how hard or soft the water flow could be, that would be even better.

Make the cubicle itself picture themed, ie underwater pictures or penguins/dolphins for example.

Little hooks for hanging things like soaps/toys, etc.

Drainage!!! I know it would help us if there wasn't such an obvious hole and then plug contraption in the middle of the wet room. J is scared of the plug and the water dissapearing! lol

 

Anyone else have any suggestions?

 


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#13 Dobbie Loves Socks

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 04:49 PM

I'll be blunt - it seems like a pretty stupid, pointless and expensive idea!!!



#14 Lionheart

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:05 PM

Lol Snix, we have a on off button outside the shower already, and jets, which barely cost anything compared to this. Well..., here my 2 get lost in the feel of the water, until it runs cold. Little one will spend ages watches the patterns it makes, both hate the feel and smell of the soaps, shampoos etc, and unscented ones really smell bad. Plus neither of them like touching wet hair, and both hate their heads being touched for someone else to wash their hair. Little one jumps and splashes, and will do a great job of falling out the door, if not through the glass, both love the splashing of the water, So along with the other comments, when they invent a shower that truly addresses a persons real sensory needs, rather than someones pre-conceived, money making ideas about what sensory means beyond lights and music, it may be worth considering.

#15 BryanUsrey

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 10:47 AM

Thanks everyone for your feedback, it's very much appreciated. Do you think it would be better if the shower could be customised, so you can just choose the features that you want to make it suitable for your child? And if you were going to research or even buy something like this, where would be your first port of call? 





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