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Is There A "cooler" Alternative To Tablets


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#1 madferretlady

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:50 PM

just musing really.. I was waiting for Beanie while she was at a teenage group therapy session got chatting to another Mum whose son also refuses to take his prescribed ritalin. We agreed that this was a problem as both could benefit as their ability to focus on anything for even 5 minutes is very poor. As a result their education is suffering. The other Mum said she wished there was another way of taking ritalin other than in tablet form - eg a patches.. ..we then got carried away and started talking about how much easier it would be to persuade reluctant teenagers if the ritalin wa sin the form of a henna tattoo or something.  But when I got home I thought --- well why not? Morphine can be applied via patches - why not ritalin?  Any thoughts?


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#2 Mozzy

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:30 AM

Because they will take it off and stick it on someone else!


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#3 madferretlady

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 07:20 AM

of course they would! never thought of that! bang goes the patches idea...but what about the "tattoo"?


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#4 Mozzy

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:55 AM

I see the appeal. I'm an adult and my epilepsy meds are still a liquid as I HATE taking pills. But at the same time I do not think a medication should be made fun. I think their has to be a happy medium. Like vitamins, they do chewy sweet types for kids but I dn't know if they would extend this to antibiotics etc. I mean for diabetic kids they have to learn to get use to injections daily. Thats horrid. But most of them adapt fine so funding into this would be hard to get.



#5 Snickas

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 11:05 AM

For a Methylphenidate based medication?
eeeekkkkkkkkkkkkkk which can be very dangerous for an NT to take ?!?!?! :unsure:

 

Let me quote something

 


In the United Kingdom, methylphenidate is a controlled 'Class B' substance. Possession without prescription carries with a sentence up to 5 years and/or an unlimited fine, and supplying it is 14 years and/or an unlimited fine.



Do you, like myself - even though my son is now an adult, have to sign the box on the top right hand corner by the pharmacist verifying who you are, everytime you get a prescription?
Do you know that Pharmacies have to keep Methylphenidate locked up in a safe?

I think it is exactly right & how it should be,  now tbh.
Would you really want to risk the effects it currently has? I know I wouldn't!!!

If there is reluctant teenagers, negotiate with them!
what I mean is...both my boys (now aged 22 & 19) have been or are still taking a Ritalin based medication...when they hit their teenage years, and any doubts set in, I made a deal with them:

"How about that we agree that you MUST take them whilst you have school/college, because we don't want to affect any of your routines or education, for your future. BUT if you want to have a go of not taking your tablets and seeing how you cope & manage, we can give it a go on weekends, where you are safe at home. BUT...if it gets really hard everyone around you to cope and manage, then i will politely request that you take a tablet and I will expect you to take it because the only time I will ask, is that you're getting out of hand and causing distress, OR you are putting either yourself or other people around you, at risk."

 

Teenagers respond better to deals/comprimises and negotiations better than telling them what to do.
 



#6 JohnBradley

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 06:35 PM

Idk... I kinda like the idea of a tattoo like sticker patch, just have to make it so that when it sticks once you can`t take it off until it wears out. 

On the other hand Snickas is right. Negotiation is always a good way to go. I`ll see if I can get a book on NLP from my girlfriend and check for some good techniques to talk them into what you need them to agree on easier. 


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#7 Mozzy

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:06 AM

Idk... I kinda like the idea of a tattoo like sticker patch, just have to make it so that when it sticks once you can`t take it off until it wears out. 

On the other hand Snickas is right. Negotiation is always a good way to go. I`ll see if I can get a book on NLP from my girlfriend and check for some good techniques to talk them into what you need them to agree on easier. 

 

Sorry, whats going to stop someone taking a sticker or tattoo off? I have had those temp tattoos before and you can rub them off. It is, in my opinion unsafe. A kid at school with a tattoo on could easily rub it off, if it was a patch take it off and another kid could wear it. A kid who does not need medication.



#8 JohnBradley

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 04:11 PM

You could stick it on their back so they can`t reach.  :tongue20: And make it like bubblegum tattoo stickers - you can rub it off but can`t apply it any more. I can`t be the only one who remembers the "tattoos" that we used to get as kids from bubblegums. 

Short-North-Tattoo-Scott-Sims-Fine-Art-B



#9 Mozzy

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:21 PM

You could stick it on their back so they can`t reach.  :tongue20: And make it like bubblegum tattoo stickers - you can rub it off but can`t apply it any more. I can`t be the only one who remembers the "tattoos" that we used to get as kids from bubblegums. 

 

 

I know the ones you mean. They could get another kid to pick it off their back. And yeah cannot be reapplied but can be licked!!

 

I remember a friends kid who was at school, another kid had nicked a stop smoking patch and they all licked them. 

 

A lot of medications are avaliable in patch form. Some people with disabilities who dribble a lot wear patches on the nexk which release a drug that lowers saliva production. But unlike an ADHD med, if another kids gets hold of them - unless they have some medical condition then they will not do the other person harm.



#10 Jolly Roger

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:34 PM

I`ll see if I can get a book on NLP from my girlfriend and check for some good techniques to talk them into what you need them to agree on easier.

NLP on kids with autism is a very bad idea.

#11 JohnBradley

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 08:44 PM

 

I`ll see if I can get a book on NLP from my girlfriend and check for some good techniques to talk them into what you need them to agree on easier.

NLP on kids with autism is a very bad idea.

 

I thought we were talking about a kid with ADHD not authism.



#12 Mozzy

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 10:12 PM

John, what is your connection to Autism? I have not seen an introduction post from you and just wondering if your a parent / person on the spectrum / professional or just an enquiring mind :)



#13 Jolly Roger

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 10:27 PM

I`ll see if I can get a book on NLP from my girlfriend and check for some good techniques to talk them into what you need them to agree on easier.

NLP on kids with autism is a very bad idea.
I thought we were talking about a kid with ADHD not authism.
In that case, it's an even worse idea.

At best NLP is a discredited pseudoscience; when used to address issues which are caused by neurological differences, it's a serious hindrance.

#14 madferretlady

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 09:26 PM

what is NLP?



#15 imperfect parent

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 02:09 PM

Neuro linguistic programming

http://en.wikipedia....tic_programming  






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