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Mental Capacity And Transition To Adult Services


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#1 Serene!

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 07:07 PM

Hi,

 

Has anyone been through the transition from child services (social) to adult services? When was your young person assessed and did they have to have a mental capacity assessment and if so, what did this involve?

 

My son is 17 and the SW has mentioned all this and I wanted to know what to expect.

 

Thanks in advance :)



#2 bluewater

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 08:14 AM

Hi,

 

We are coming to that stage now, ds1 is 16. Unfortunately, I don't think I can be of much help, as ds1 doesn't want to engage with adult services, and as he is very articulate and capable in some respects, this appears to be OK with social services...

 

I'm sure there will be someone who has been through the transition with more advice!



#3 apricot

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 02:42 PM

DS has GCSE's so SW assumed he had capacity without any form of assessment.

 

And although he qualified for help from adult services, the help was one day a week in a supposedly supportive ASD environment run by some terribly well-meaning ladies who tried to get him to make cakes and name emotions on pictures.

DUH !!

Needless to say that didn't last very long and DS is adamant that he is never going to get involved with social services again. 



#4 imperfect parent

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Posted 23 September 2017 - 11:40 AM

 

The MCA says that a person is unable to make their own decision if they cannot do one or more of the following four things:

  1. Understand information given to them.
  2. Retain that information long enough to be able to make the decision.
  3. Weigh up the information available to make the decision.

 Mental capacity Act (MCA)

DS  is able to understand, retain and weigh up information, but making decisions is almost impossible for him when anxious which is currently 99.9 % of the time.



#5 caci

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 06:57 AM

IP, I know exactly what you mean about the inability to make a decision. I suppose the ASD thinking is along the lines of "If I don't make a decision at all, I can't get the decision wrong"

 

We haven't considered adult services at all as we didn't engage with children's services, and we haven't had an assessment for EHCP yet either.

 

I am seriously considering if it is worth just keeping quiet and dropping off the radar all together.



#6 bluewater

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 09:36 AM

That is really interesting about the decision making part. Ds1 definitely has issues around decision making, which causes quite a lot of stress for those around him.



#7 imperfect parent

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:08 AM

It's not just decision making for DS, he has trouble answering questions.  He explains as even when he knows the answer he can't answer, so presumably that is a demand reaction linked to anxiety.  His example is that when some one asks him if he has had breakfast he knows the answer, but can't answer, but the pressure ramps because he knows he should answer.  He's not slow in offering his opinion in  a group situation so long as he isn't asked.  This has led to professionals misinterpreting his communication. and concluding it's a choice not to speak, not an inability.

 

He asking has trouble asking for things even when he knows the answer will be yes; he even asks for permission to send his own money.  the more he want something, the harder he finds it to ask.  Not your average teenager!






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