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Useful Adult Services?


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#1 apricot

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 01:50 PM

DS is a bright anxious ASD type and turning 18 shortly.

 

Social services asked him to 'make a phone call to discuss his support needs' - he doesn't make phone calls or talk to strangers. So that was instantly off-putting.

 

On offer is re-branded adult daycare. So making cakes / growing plants / working in the community cafe with learning disabled adults. There is no way a service designed for learning disabled people who are socially able but need adult help/supervision, is ever going to work for a bright youngster who hates adult interference and wants to be independent.

 

CAMHS has already dropped him because he is turning 18, They suggested we look at the adult "health and wellbeing" offer. Which is 6 group sessions for anxiety targeted at normal individuals, again not worth bothering with.

 

I've been offered a direct payment for him but I can't find anything appropriate to spend it on. He already has a gym membership through college.

 

I was wondering if anyone has actually found anything useful in adult services? 



#2 imperfect parent

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 03:24 PM

It all seems to hinge on what is offered locally.  That said DS2 is taking part in research at uni and is finding counselling part of that useful.  He also has a mentor for an hour a week to keep himself orgnanised which is helping though he still uses us more when deadlines approach or  he is ill.

 

NAS offer support in some areas, but that can start at a minimum of 25 hours.  We have none here.

 

MIND offer support, but that is in effect a franchise and varies so worth looking locally.

 

With direct payments you can use organisations not just individuals.

 

We've been asked what we would spend direct payments on, but not told how much DS1 would be eligible for.  He has been given 15 hours of support, but that is based on what he can access from others, not the total amount of support that he gets from us.

 

Will try to post more later.



#3 bluewater

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 04:20 PM

This is helpful. No one in SW has been able to tell us what is available through adult services when ds moves on yet. He is leaving school in May, but despite reams of policies about transition planning, it seems it all relies on ds asking for help himself, and admitting he needs help in some areas (he does, but will never admit it). We are dreading the change.

#4 imperfect parent

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 06:29 PM

The Law is different in England and Wales, but the overriding principles are the same.

This link gives the bare bones https://www.nhs.uk/c...is-a-care-planĀ (England) and this is more helpful in trying to complete a care plan. http://www.hafal.org..._Planning_1.pdf (Wales)

 

Although the Welsh document is for Mental health the proforma used is the same as used by Social Services when the social worker lead person.  I wish I had seen it before DS's assessment.

 

Remember that you as a carer have a choice when your child turns 18, you do not have to provide any care, but you may chose to.  The  needs assessment should be done as though you are not available and then it is up to you what you want to provide with the council making up the difference.  This includes whether or not you want you child to live at home.  Personally I think 18 is a bit young to push a vulnerable young person out of home, but i wouldn't stop someone who wants to go.

 

Sadly our council takes a different view and fails to assess needs as though parents aren't willing and able to help.  This leads to them assuming we are doing nothing and downplaying needs and failing to monitor support. We remain in the blamed position that we were in when DS struggled at school with no understanding of the effort he makes.






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