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Adhd Without The H And Other Stuff


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#1 rama

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 02:14 PM

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Hi,

Can anyone point me in the direction of info about ADD specifically as so much info seems to be more about ADHD and hyperactivity isnt a problem here but the inattentiveness etc maybe.

 

My daughter has problems listening to what you are saying, following instructions, either forgets completely or remembers bits of it.She will do impulsive things like picking of the new seal around the window just as I have asked her not to, stop to do something on the way out the door for school  that is really unnecessary.She fiddles with anything on the table or makes annoying noises with the chair etc and will fiddle with her hair obsessively and not seem to be totally still.The rest of her body is usually still though it isnt like she is jumping around pinging of the walls.( Is that a myth?) She will also sit or lie down and read for a couple of hours full attention and not hear anything! I can imagine her sitting quietly in assessment not moving an inch.

 

My MIL who has OCD cant sit and read a book, on holiday she would pretend to and then get distracted or chat  and end up getting up.She gets distracted by others talking as she wants to know what THEY are talking about so you will often lose her attention even if if it was important.She never sits down in our house ( could be the OCD stuff )and does stimming type stuff with her foot jiggling if stressed.

She will also do things like read our mail on the table absentmindedly.She is also volatile in blaming other people and being dramatic in telling stories, lying to cover her tracks.

I seem to spend time thinking whatever is going on with both of them it is i that front part of the brain IYKWIM.

 

ASD or ADD or just me thinking everyone else has a problem!

 

As my daughter has her assessment for ADHD in a month I wondered if they would be able to pick up ADD without another test? 

 

Any advice or experiences would be soooo welcome.Ta xx

 

 


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#2 Tangled

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 02:45 PM

Hi Rama

I don't have any experience about this but just looked it up Wikipedia and picked this bit out. You might well have already seen it but if not it might fit your DD:

ADHD-I is similar to the other subtypes of ADHD in that it is characterized primarily by inattention, easy distractibility, disorganization, procrastination, and forgetfulness; where it differs is in lethargy - fatigue, and having fewer or no symptoms of hyperactivity or impulsiveness typical of the other ADHD subtypes.[1] In some cases, children who enjoy learning may develop a sense of fear when faced with structured or planned work, especially long or group-based that requires extended focus, even if they thoroughly understand the topic. Children with ADD may be at greater risk of academic failures and early withdrawal from school.[2] Teachers and parents may make incorrect assumptions about the behaviours and attitudes of a child with ADD, and may provide them with frequent and erroneous negative feedback (e.g. "careless", "you're irresponsible", "you're immature", "you're lazy", "you don't care/show any effort", "you just aren't trying", etc.).[3]

Just ignore it if it doesn't match your DD but seems to define what I guess ADD is. Others with more knowledge will no doubt be able to add more info for you too. I guess if they are assessing for ADHD it should cover all the subtypes.

Keep us posted on how you get on.

Tangled xx
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#3 Mozzy

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 03:11 PM

 

My MIL who has OCD cant sit and read a book, on holiday she would pretend to and then get distracted or chat  and end up getting up.She gets distracted by others talking as she wants to know what THEY are talking about so you will often lose her attention even if if it was important.She never sits down in our house ( could be the OCD stuff )and does stimming type stuff with her foot jiggling if stressed.

She will also do things like read our mail on the table absentmindedly.She is also volatile in blaming other people and being dramatic in telling stories, lying to cover her tracks.

I seem to spend time thinking whatever is going on with both of them it is i that front part of the brain IYKWIM.

 

 

OCD? As in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder? OCD tends to me more hand washing, touching things a set number of times, having all the light switches in the same direction, not stepping on paving cracks, AND having the compulsive thoughts behind them such as "if I do not turn the lights off 15 times before I go out I will get run over by a car"



#4 rama

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 05:04 PM

 

 

My MIL who has OCD cant sit and read a book, on holiday she would pretend to and then get distracted or chat  and end up getting up.She gets distracted by others talking as she wants to know what THEY are talking about so you will often lose her attention even if if it was important.She never sits down in our house ( could be the OCD stuff )and does stimming type stuff with her foot jiggling if stressed.

She will also do things like read our mail on the table absentmindedly.She is also volatile in blaming other people and being dramatic in telling stories, lying to cover her tracks.

I seem to spend time thinking whatever is going on with both of them it is i that front part of the brain IYKWIM.

 

 

OCD? As in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder? OCD tends to me more hand washing, touching things a set number of times, having all the light switches in the same direction, not stepping on paving cracks, AND having the compulsive thoughts behind them such as "if I do not turn the lights off 15 times before I go out I will get run over by a car"

 

Yes Mozzy sorry I wasn't clear.

 

My mother in law  was diagnosed a long time ago with OCD and has a cleaning obsession that means she is in the house most of the day and then doesnt shower at home but at a sports club etc but we think there is more to it than that as she displays other traits as outlined above.It is difficult as noone talks about it, everyone is used to it and works around the controls she sets.

 

Anyway I know that ASD /ADD and OCD can be comorbid if that is the right word and we are trying to see if Mother in Laws and my daughters behaviours are linked at all. 

 

Hope that makes a bit more sense! R x



#5 lennie len

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 02:13 PM

I have two boys, both on the autism spectrum, one has ADHD, and the other has ADD.

 

The one with ADD is as verbally impulsive as his brother, as inattentive as his brother, fidgets as much as his brother, but he does not bound around buildings, roll around on the floor (any floor), run around the house, rock about, sit upside down, tear around the place from the moment he awakes, to the moment he FINALLY falls asleep.

 

The "FINALLY" is because it takes a stupendious time for his brain to switch off (the hyper one) and go to sleep.

Also the hyper one is constantly seeking stimulation from other people, TV, computer, ALL THE TIME!!!!!!! When he does not get this attention, he turns to annoying others which also gives him the same desired effect (he is stimulated).

He is also unable to occupy himself with his own things, he needs other input from other humans, or electronic gadgets.


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#6 madferretlady

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:23 PM

hi there - I have a son (9) with ADHD and a daughter whose initial diagnosis was ADD (when she was 11). They now say she has asperger traits too. The two children are very different in the following ways:

 

J (adhd) is always there always in your face and always demanding, always getting involved in stuff thats none of his business etc etc etc

 

C (ADD) is so passive you can forget she is there, would die of mortification rather than talk to anyone or draw attention to heself

 

The are the same in that:

 

both cannot focus for more than a few minutes listening to something which does not engage  their attention, before they drift off (J to go and annoy someone or run amok, C to sit quietly in her own wee dream world). Conversely both can sit for long enough focussing on something they are particularly interested in -oblivious to anything around them. Their brains are like light switches - they are either "on" (ie totally involved and interested) or "off" (ie not interested). There is no in between. It is not a case of them trying harder to concentrate - they really really cannot unless they are really really interested. Which is why so many of them have difficulty at school!  The ADHDs tend to act out, the ADDs tend to just sit and dream. 

 

I filled out the same form for both children - as you know ADHD consists of both attention deficit disorder and a hyperactivity disorder.  Some children are predominantly "Attention Deficit" - these are the hard ones to spot as they generally do not actively misbehave. They are often labelled dreamers and lazy, with their report cards theme being "could do better if they would concentrate/try harder/focus....". Some children are predominantly "Hyperactive", some children have a more even mix of both attention deficit and hyperactivity.

 

 The questionnaire I completed had many questions to tease out not only whether or not the child was on the ADD/ADHD spectrum, but also where on the "spectrum" they were.

 

This is just my experience - hope it helps

 

there is your 


sorry - another thought - my J never slept either. he could not wind down  but would keeo going until he would just suddenly fall asleep. Our consultant told me his brain did not produce the "slow down its sleepy time" hormone melatonin. Apparently this is reasonably common with adhd just drop. She prescribed melatonin for him & the difference is unbelievable. For the first time in his wee life (9 years) he settled down and went to sleep about an hour and a half after taking it. We had a lovely time - a cuddle a story a goodnight kiss and then zzzz. He was so delighted - he had never experienced that lovely sleepy settling down feeling before. It is NOT a sleeping tablet - just a hormone which normal people produce all by themselves. He has been taking it for about 6 months now and we haven't looked back. You have to be careful and take it about an hour or so before you feel the child should be sleeping and then make sure all the bedtime routines are done & child is in bed before then. Otherwise you will miss the boat and the effect will have worn off.

 

Also -  I only noticed that J wasn't sleeping because he would be charging round the place annoying everyone and unable to stay in his room. But actually C was also not sleeping. She just stayed in her room quietly reading until the wee small hours. i was too taken up with trying to stay sane dealing with J to notice. 

 

And - final point - I also have ferrets! Four at present - 2 rescues and 2 bought. Nice to meet a fellow ferret fancier! 



#7 strawbie

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 01:57 AM

Out of interest…….what help or treatment do you receive for inattentive ADHD???  

thanks



#8 madferretlady

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 07:20 PM

re query about medication for predominantly inattentive ADHD:

 

surprising its the same as medication for predominantly hyper adhd! Both my son (adhd) and daughter (add) are on medekinet (which has the same generic drug as ritalin. It is a stimulant. not a sedative, and helps children at all parts of the ADD/ADHD spectrum to focus.

 



#9 Snickas

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 05:59 AM

There isn't much anyone can do in regards to therapy with ADHD.
We tried anger management and behavioural therapy, with both of my boys, tbh it didn't last 2 secs when they blow! The only thing that did work was immediate intervention & supervision.
Weighted items like a lap pad / shoulder pad / weighted vest, even a weighted blanket for when they are in bed can help can help to make their proprioception and vestibular needs (makes them feel a bit centered/stopping the hyperactivity). Fiddles can help in the classroom, but it all needs constant re-enforcement and reminding, continuously.
the medication is a lot more effective and it's amazing at how effective they are.
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#10 madferretlady

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 10:54 AM

i agree with snickas - the medication is very effective. These children "misbehave" as they have a constant need for stimulation. They crave it because their systems do not naturally keep them in balance - they walk heavily and noisily to "centre" themselves, they run around touching everything and getting into everything because their brains drive them to in order to get the stimulation they need to "be". Many of the drugs treating ADHD (I am no medic so I do not know about them all) are stimulants, and that is how they help - they provide the stimulation the child's own brain is not providing, releasing the child from having to self-stimulate, thus enabling them to pay attention to other things. Looking at it this way much of the acting out is not bad behaviour it is self medication.






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