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Children Who Refuse To Do School Work


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#1 lennie len

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 12:02 PM

I am looking for advice, as advice we (me and teachers) get from, is off sick......again.
My son is getting worse at school.
He has 1 to 1 for two hours a day and works well with her.
When she goes home he refuses to take part or do anything,and will choose to read a book.
Teacher has major battles with him and she shouldn't have to,she has other children to teach.
I know work changes and becomes more difficult.
I know when I want him to do something,blackmail of "if you do this,you can have a biscuit (GF)" works.
He learnt to ride a bike in two hours at the weekend with the promise of biscuits for
1)getting on bike
2)pedalling for 10 seconds
3)starting the bike off on his own and
4) using the brakes.
It worked.
However you can't use biscuit bribery in school, so if anyone's children are like this,what have you found to help your child within school,that I could try and enforce at home and introduce to school?
No to charts....he is obsessed with charts.
He is becoming more hard work the older he gets.

#2 tinalee

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 12:39 PM

my 7 yr old is often like this, he refuses to do anything involving writing at all, point blank. yet is actually very good at writing/reading etc. sadly nothing our school have tried has worked and docs are now looking at PDA as a possible DX (patholigical demand avoidance if you like me have never heard of it lol) so if you have any luck please do share!!

i can empathise with your sympathy for his teacher tho!! our poor teacher spends around 80% of the day battling with him and generally has little to show for it at the end. how she manages to run the other 23 children i dont know but the woman is a saint!! its at the point where they have to draft the headmaster in to argue with him so the class can get on with their work!! Jamie can find 1001 ways to avoid doing anything he doesnt want to do!!

the only thing that does work now and then is to sort of sneak the work up on him? if you distract his attention and kind of slip the worksheet in front of him he does sometimes complete it before he realises whats going on. lol. we do this for homework times. i also use the sudden aproach. i just leap out with a reading book and sort of yell quick read it then we can do xxxx, its sneaky but so is he!!

#3 lennie len

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 01:02 PM

I'll look PDA up.
My son, when asked refuses or argues to the point where you wish you hadn't asked him or requested him to do something in the first place.

#4 jennybongo

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 01:44 PM

My son will only do work on his terms. If it doesn't interest him he won't do it.
The autism team made him 'now and then' cards. using pictures and velcro.ie. NOW you have to write (pen and book symbol)..THEN he can choose between two of his favourite activities (computer symbol or drawing symbol) This enables him to see that he has to comply then get to choose after what he does. It works quite well. He seems to need these rules and actually likes them because he can't can't do this on his own.
His is very visual and alot of asd children seem to benefit from visual signs as prompts. Keep his choices very limited, choices can be difficult. Instructions to be very consise and they could try either ''you choose or I will choose for you''..this enables him to feel in control but ultimatley they are getting him to do what they want.
The school have to make reasonable adjustments for his disability by law. His work could tie in with the other children but can be adapted to something your son is interested in. For example my son wont won't change his reading book and wants the same one every week, the teachers wanted him to change it. Why make him when you could get him to read a book from home he likes or choose a library book to read.
My son works much better now that reasonable adjustments have been made.
It will always be difficult but there are ways to help them and schools shouldn't be so ridgid either!

Edited by jennybongo, 13 May 2009 - 01:49 PM.


#5 lennie len

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 02:52 PM

Ooooh well here's one explanation of today's behaviour.
Hybrid is writing,TA says his writing is good.
Two others are drawing,TA says their drawings are very good.
He has poor understanding,saying his work is good compared to very good like his peers work, to Hybrid is like saying his work is not good.
He said he ran off to the toilet to calm down.

#6 Kadenza

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 04:24 PM

Hi,

That's great that he could articulate the problem so clearly. I expect the TA will be pleased to know what the trigger was, too, and it's not too much of an adjustment for you to ask for - that she takes great care over the way she praises your DS and others within earshot.

Can you also do a social story about it, so that he can get used to the idea that 'good' and 'very good' are both excellent?!

K.x

#7 Eggman

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 05:18 PM

Hi Lennie. As you know James is only 5 so not having too many difficulties at the moment as they are pretty easy on them in Reception but this could possibly be a difficulty in the future so I'm reading the posts with interest.

Made me laugh when you said about the biscuits. James is exactly the same can get him to do anything with the bribe of a biscuit.

He will do his homework well if he knows he's going to get a couple of biscuits afterwards. All I have to do is mention the biscuits if he starts mucking about half way through :rolleyes: .

#8 Gailed

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 08:24 PM

S is not at all eager to do home work at home voluntarily, be it maths english or reading. What I tend to do at home is use schoolwork as a punishment. Then S will comply and do his home work with no hassle. Not good I know but it works for us here.

#9 kira

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 08:43 AM

We have just the same problem with our 7 yr old AS son. He has refused to do any schoolwork all term, but will happily read. I think that this is becasue everything else involves handwriting (inc maths) and he is not 'perfect' at it and finds it harder. I have asked his TA to send home any work he refuses to do at school and have made him do it at home. This has helped enormously, because he would rather do it at school than home (where he has to do it instead of TV/computer time). I have aslo asked the school to give him work he finds easy to imcrease his confidence, and to let him choose what to do (eg counting money or subtraction). Giving him an element of choice also helps. I agree rewarding schoolwork with an activity he enjoys is also important - or our son earns tokens which build up to computer time.
Good luck

#10 lennie len

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 01:13 PM

Sounds good Kira.
I too have told school to send home school work he has refused to do.
Thing is,although he is bright,he needs someone to start his thought off,he is ok doing factual stuff,but anything that requires imagination or using abstract ideas, well he just finds it so difficult.

#11 kira

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 03:57 PM

Sounds good Kira.
I too have told school to send home school work he has refused to do.
Thing is,although he is bright,he needs someone to start his thought off,he is ok doing factual stuff,but anything that requires imagination or using abstract ideas, well he just finds it so difficult.


Our boy is the same - a boffin at maths/reading/memorising facts but refuses to draw/write/tell stories etc etc - he is only 6 so not a big issue yet but I foresee major problems as he gets older and needs to engage with more complex/imaginative thinking




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