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Quiet/safe Rooms In Schools.


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#1 Miss c

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 10:33 PM

When your child has a meltdown at school,where do they place him/her?what does the room look like,what is in the room etc.
The placement where i have been offered and told is safe ...their calming /safe room has a radiator in.What do you all think?

#2 Princess Leia

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 08:38 AM

My son goes to a very small village school and he does not have a safe room for meltdowns.I think it's just whichever room is quietest at the time. Thankfully, he hasn't had too many recently!

Does an adult stay with the child in the safe room? Is it one of those huge old fashioned school radiators? Does it get so hot that you can't touch it? It may be worth raising your concern with the placement.

Hopefully someone else can shed some light :)

Sorry, I'm probably not much help.

#3 Kadenza

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 08:52 AM

Boo has a pop-up tent that is kept in a rarely used class room. She doesn't really have melt-downs though, and uses it as a quiet/calm-down space. A TA stays close by, and is there to praise her for using the tent "correctly" eg. to calm herself down.

#4 Miss Mac

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 09:25 AM

What is your quiet/safe room at home like? School may be willing to copy that to provide continuity. I'd talk to them and give them a detailed description of what you have and why it works. Explain why you've had to remove your radiators to contain meltdowns safely at home.

They may be willing to remove the radiator. However, when it is very cold in there in the middle of winter, you've got to bear in mind that you've given approval for the radiator to be removed and school will still have to use that room for its purpose, even if it is very cold.

Some special schools use safespaces as a calming room. Some schools don't have spaces at all because their rooms are all filled to capacity. Most have a normal office or small space (including radiator) where the children can go. Some have a separate area of the class room for a quiet area. Only in the first of these is access to a radiator restricted, in none of them is the radiator removed. I believe there is padding that could be strapped to the radiator, but I don't know much about it. We've luckily never had the radiator problem, even in Little Nutter's bedroom when he has meltdowns - he seems to avoid them somehow.

#5 Swan

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 07:44 PM

My son has just moved to a secondary ASD unit.
The safe room is padded ( like a padded cell) the heating in the ceiling. It has bean bags and soft toys in it and is mainly used as a chill out room but is really for when one of them has a meltdown. It's very small though.

#6 hev

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 08:09 PM

Tyke didn't really have a quiet space in mainstream until this year when his class was a small mobile. He always had a seperate work station that he could use.

Tykes place was a pop up tent in the class store room. It was not ideal but it was only space they had. School thought about the risk (essential medication for a diabetic child and general storage area) but he was always monitored.

He is now in special school - they have a sensory room but I don't think tyke has ever been in it.

#7 Mozzy

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 08:30 PM

When your child has a meltdown at school,where do they place him/her?what does the room look like,what is in the room etc.
The placement where i have been offered and told is safe ...their calming /safe room has a radiator in.What do you all think?


Are we talking mainstream school or special school?

#8 Miss c

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 10:28 PM

When your child has a meltdown at school,where do they place him/her?what does the room look like,what is in the room etc.
The placement where i have been offered and told is safe ...their calming /safe room has a radiator in.What do you all think?


Are we talking mainstream school or special school?


Special school.

I had been told appropriate provision had been made for my sons meltdown and found out this was untrue .I have not placed my son at this school for various other reasons also.When i told the school this room was unsuitable for my son they did say they would tell the Authority and see if any changes could be made but they never got back to me on this ...giving me further concerns about the placement.

#9 shellbay72

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 11:22 PM

My middle son went to a specialist resource at primary school age and they had a quiet room for when the kids had major meltdowns. The room was spacious but had nothing in it. There was also no door handles inside so kids couldnt just get out. There was no radiators etc incase kids tried to pull them off.
A fire alarm was on the ceiling and kids used to throw shoes etc at it so there shoes were removed before going in.
A staff member was always present either in the room or immediately outside, depending on the child.
There was also a small window for checking pupils.
I must stress that the door was only closed when kids were extremely violent. They were also only in the room for a few minutes.
The kids also used the room at other times for reading, sensory integration etc when they could not cope with classroom situations.
Youngest has access to a sensory room which has specialist lights and toys etc, which is suited to his needs.
Unfortunately this does not help him for meltdowns as it can cause sensory overload when he is stressed.
We have had a quiet room added on to our home. It is the size of about a single bedroom, it has nothing in it. We have no radiator in it because middle son is very violent and destructive. We have no handle inside the room, but there is a way of getting out. There is no window, it would not be safe for him to have one.
We have had the pipes installed for a radiator and we hope that at some point in the future that he will be a bit calmer and we can then install a radiator.

#10 Jolly Roger

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 05:57 AM

I had been told appropriate provision had been made for my sons meltdown and found out this was untrue

This is a qualitative judgement, anyway.

Let me give you an example: there is a safe room in my special school classroom. When I took over the classroom it had padding on all the walls, a lock on the door and bars on the window.

When the new headteacher arrived last year, she took one look at it and told me it was inappropriate to have a padded cell in a classroom. I was given a budget and a timescale to remove all the padding, re-plaster it, remove the door and the bars from the window, and add furniture.

The new safe area, with no soft edges anywhere at all, is used just as much as the old one.

#11 Miss c

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 12:41 AM

I had been told appropriate provision had been made for my sons meltdown and found out this was untrue

This is a qualitative judgement, anyway.

Let me give you an example: there is a safe room in my special school classroom. When I took over the classroom it had padding on all the walls, a lock on the door and bars on the window.

When the new headteacher arrived last year, she took one look at it and told me it was inappropriate to have a padded cell in a classroom. I was given a budget and a timescale to remove all the padding, re-plaster it, remove the door and the bars from the window, and add furniture.

The new safe area, with no soft edges anywhere at all, is used just as much as the old one.


but with a very angry child , the furniture could be dangerous-they could hurt themselves.

#12 Jolly Roger

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 07:33 AM

With a very angry child, the floor and their own fists are dangerous.

I have injuries to my fingers right now received when I tried to stop a child from punching himself in the face.

#13 Miss c

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 12:09 AM

The room needs to be right for the child,i know my son would not be safe in a room with furniture in, an empty room won't stop everything i know but it's about reducing the risks.They're all different that's all.My son has never punched himself ,that's a blessing but he can go for me.

#14 Jolly Roger

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 05:55 PM

it's about reducing the risks.They're all different that's all.

It is all about reducing the risks - but the way to do that is not by creating a place to put someone in while they are breaking down. That's not reducing the risk - that's moving the risk to another place.

My experiences tell me that careful risk and behaviour management planning is far more effective.

#15 Tatty

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 06:07 PM

How about the staff room? Where he went when upset (he is taught in there) he shut the door and they left him in there alone (so as not to upset him further) with an electric kettle, cutlery, glasses and members of staff's possessions, a sink, table chairs etc etc. But it was OK because they listened outside the door and could have gone outside and looked through the window 'if' they were worried :blink: .

Tatty x




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